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Coyotes


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#21 RiverFox

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 09:49 PM

Coyote's were introduced some years back by the DNR and have for a long time
been illegal to shoot unless you are given special permission from the state.

:no:

But the animal, which began migrating eastward from the western United States some 80 years ago, is now believed to have evolved into a new subspecies, known as the eastern coyote, that is larger and different from its forebears, the common, or western, coyotes. And scientists who have studied the history and habits of the eastern variety think they now know when and how the animals migrated and the routes they followed on their hegira across nearly half the continent.
NY Times - March 3, 1981



In Indiana, the coyote is considered a nuisance animal.

Indiana Code 14-22-6-12
Taking of coyotes
Sec. 12. A person:
(1) who possesses land; or
(2) designated in writing by a person who possesses land;
may take coyotes on the land at any time.
As added by P.L.1-1995, SEC.15.


The Hunting and Trapping Guide for the years 2000-2001

A resident landowner or tenant may take without a permit, a coyote that is discovered damaging property; you must report the taking of the animalto a conservation officer within 72 hrs. The officer will direct you as to how to dispose of the animal. Landowners may take coyotes at any time on the land they own or provide written permission for others to take coyotes on their land at any time. Even though a landowner can toake a coyote at any time, he or she is still bound by the legal regulations set forth by the Departmen of Natural Resources. It is illegal to remove any wild animal from any cavity or den. It is illegal to disturb the den or nest of any mammal by digging, shooting, cutting, or chipping or with the aid of smoke,fire, fumes, chemicals, ferret or other small animals, or any device introduced into the hole where the animal is sheltered.



#22 HoundDog

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Posted 28 October 2010 - 10:15 PM

Out west they use sighthounds and sighthound mixes to hunt coyotes. They've been pack hunters for thousands years; comes naturally to many of them. I don't personally approve of it but they're apparently very effective, especially the ones with high prey drives.

Ain't a critter in the world (except a cheetah) that can outrun a Greyhound in its prime, one that can hit 45 mph in three strides!

Posted Image

Edited by HoundDog, 28 October 2010 - 10:15 PM.


#23 MBHeights1

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 06:12 AM

and have for a long time been illegal to shoot unless you are given special permission from the state.


This is incorrect, landowners can shoot them.

#24 RiverFox

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 04:28 PM

... also.

While gathering information I came across this:
DNR Release - May 07, 2010
(we've discussed this before in Chatter)
It was confirmed in Greene County.
About what you'd expect from a westerly migration.
(the same route taken by coyotes through Illinois & Indiana)

#25 Supermike

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:00 PM

Wow... we had a cougar conversation around here somewhere (yes, this kind), but there were no sightings at the time. Just droppings, etc.

"Different published reports cite the last documented case of a wild mountain lion in Indiana as somewhere between 1850 and 1865."

Wow...

Saw several out in Colorado, though... they are brave, too.

#26 WhatChaNeed

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:20 PM

Rumor has it that black bears have crossed the Ohio River into Indiana, between Madison and Aurora. I've heard that a couple of KY elk have made the swim, too.

#27 Supermike

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 05:22 PM

Geez... at this rate, they'll be making national geographic movies here. lol!

Maybe they're all heading to that new wetlands/prarie preserve up in the northern part of the state. (Kankakee Sands)
http://wildindiana.c...kankakee-sands/

#28 HoosierMomma

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 05:39 PM

A memo was circulated to the employees at the Census Bureau to be aware of coyotes in the parking lots.

#29 RiverFox

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 06:13 PM

Yes ... they've been spotted at the edge of the walking track.
The woods behind there is dense enough and large enough for
them to actually have a residence.

#30 i like squirrels

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 06:17 PM

They are quite common out near the Port, we used to see them all the time. I've also seen them trotting down Utica Pike late at night, along with some HUGE racoons and possums.

#31 deerhunter

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Posted 30 October 2010 - 07:38 PM

They are quite common out near the Port, we used to see them all the time. I've also seen them trotting down Utica Pike late at night, along with some HUGE racoons and possums.

I have seen them along highway 62 alot more since they have taken down all of the fencing along the powder plant. My guess is they are coming from there.

#32 ctownmom

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Posted 01 November 2010 - 10:04 AM

A memo was circulated to the employees at the Census Bureau to be aware of coyotes in the parking lots.


Great! I work next door to the Census Bureau and have often used the walking track. I feel like I'm being stalked...

#33 LegalNurseConsultant

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Posted 07 November 2010 - 11:24 AM

My husband was on his way to cut wood on a friend's property in Charlestown, but closer outside city limits, and he saw a pack of coyotes crossing the road. So clearly they seem to be around in many places. I won't even let my service dog go outside at night now, too scary!

#34 GreenShoes

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Posted 08 November 2010 - 01:36 PM

Geez...I live off Salem-Noble and I hear tons of them at night but never close to the house. I guess it's just a matter of time. I do know we used to have 2 cats that stayed outside, now we have none. I figured one of them was dinner for a coyote since she was really old and slow but the other was a young, spry little guy. I hate to think he was a snack for some coyote but I've not seen him in a long time. Now I'm beginning to wonder if my kiddo is safe in our own yard after dark?!

#35 Happycat

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 01:00 AM

Just heard a pack of coyotes howling a few minutes ago. It was eerie, to say the least. I hope they weren't after one of the neighbor's cows, but I'll bet they were.

#36 moose

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Posted 09 November 2010 - 10:25 PM

This afternoon when I was going to pick up my daughter from school, I saw a coyote at the S curve on High Jackson Road.

#37 annapate

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 04:19 PM

I need to know if the City of Jeffersonville doing anything about these coyotes? I had three in my backyard...and we hear them throughout the day. I'm scared to be out with my toddler playing in her swingset. :no:



#38 GuyInTheCountry

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Posted 16 August 2014 - 08:57 PM

From the Indiana DNR Website ...... 

 

Coyotes

Landowners, or a person with written permission from a landowner, may take coyotes year-round on private property by snaring, trapping or shooting without a permit from the DNR. A landowner does not need a permit to take coyotes on his/her property by one of these methods, but a hunting or trapping license is required to hunt or trap coyotes on land other than your own.

 

http://www.in.gov/dn...shwild/5699.htm






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