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#1 Col-Arthur

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 11:51 AM

I'm a new resident of Indiana and need to understand the political system here.

I live in Union township, a political subset of Clark county from what I gather.

Are there township meetings other than the mandated January meeting of the trustees?

How does the system work?

I came from Kentucky where the divisions begin at precinct level then up the ladder to city/county divisions, state legislative districts and finally to the federal congressional districts.

I'd like to be active politically but don't know where to begin. I'll observe for as much time as necessary to become aware and informed of the issues locally.

Any information will be appreciated.


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#2 Oldgoat

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 12:43 PM

    Trustees and their Advisory Board usually meet several times a year.  If you contact the Union Twp. Trustee, I'm sure they will gladly let you know when the next meeting is.  The Township Trustee was originally the most basic govermental unit under the Indiana Constitution.  They were responsible for tax assessment, fire protection, schools and even funding a Township Constable.  In recent years, most of these duties have been transferred to county assessors, fire protection districts and school districts in larger and more populated counties, each of which has their own taxing authority. The traditional Trustee duties that remain in many townships are poor relief, maintaining abandoned cemetaries, indigent funerals and overseeing Township owned property, much of which is used by fire departments and community buildings.  The poor relief duties can be substantial in larger, more urban townships such as Jeffersonville and Charlestown.  Indiana Law also requires Trustees to provide insulin to indigent diabetics and a few other duties that escape me at the moment.

   The Board is advisory in nature with the Trustee having the final say in most matters but as you can see above, the position is not what it used to be in MOST counties.  There are some places where Trustees still provide schools and fire protection but they are dwindling.  It is likely that the position may be eliminated entirely in the future.  Hope this helps!


Edited by Oldgoat, 04 January 2016 - 12:47 PM.

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#3 Savile Row

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 02:09 PM

"Deputy-Arthur" posted: "I'm a new resident of Indiana and need to understand the political system here."
"I came from Kentucky where the divisions begin at precinct level

then up the ladder to city/county divisions, state legislative districts and finally to the federal congressional districts."

A good place to start
would be to do the same things
that you did in whatever county that you previously lived.
Maybe call one of your contacts there and they would give you advise.
Additionally,
you could then contact Kelley for the Independent Party,
Tom for the Democrat Party,
or Jamey for the Republican Party.
 
There is a lot going on in Clark County this year with the local races.
There will be loads of them filing very soon and they will bustin' their busy motivated and concerned politico ***es
chasing down votes and supporters!
 
Also,
the variety of candidates for state and federal office
have lots of campaign volunteers as well.
President, governor, senator, congresspersons, state offices,

state rep, state senator, etc.
 
Call a candidate and/or the office of someone you would like to support
and ask them what you can do.
The nifty  Newsandtribune
covers the filings of the candidates.
That period will be opening up in February for the primary selection  process.
 
Check out the Clark County Facebook pages for the D's and the R's to ask how to get involved.
 
The county level of  government will be also electing two county commissioners,
three at-large county council critters,
a surveyor, and coroner.
 
If you are interested in learning,
look up the Clark County Government web site
and find out when the commissioners and the county council hold their meetings.
A great place to watch your government in action is to attend those meetings.


Edited by Savile Row, 04 January 2016 - 02:43 PM.


#4 Big Bopper

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 02:39 PM

I'm a new resident of Indiana and need to understand the political system here.

I live in Union township, a political subset of Clark county from what I gather.

Are there township meetings other than the mandated January meeting of the trustees?

How does the system work?

I came from Kentucky where the divisions begin at precinct level then up the ladder to city/county divisions, state legislative districts and finally to the federal congressional districts.

I'd like to be active politically but don't know where to begin. I'll observe for as much time as necessary to become aware and informed of the issues locally.

Any information will be appreciated.

 

Jeffersonville City Council meets the 1st and 3rd Monday each month. Jeffersonville City Hall 

 

The County Commissioners, I believe, are every other Thursday at the County Courthouse

 

The County Council is the 2nd Monday each month at the County Courthouse.

Not sure of the times.


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#5 Savile Row

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 02:41 PM

Deputy-Arthur, noting your tag thingy that says:
"We can have a democratic society

or we can have the concentration of great wealth in the hands of the few.

We cannot have both."
-- Louis Brandeis, Supreme Court Justice from 1916-1939."

 

As they say in poker, if that is a "tell", then it might be a good idea

to leave a post on the Clark County Democrat Party Facebook site and ask them to contact you.

Also, if Bernie makes it to Indiana, he will be needing motivated and concerned volunteers and organizational persons.

 

If you are really itching to get fully into the fray,

maybe a race for the county council at-large could be a fun move.

A candidate only has to finish  in the top three of the D or the R primaries to make the cut for the General Election.

The Independent party will probably have a nominating caucus if they wish to run anyone this year.


Edited by Savile Row, 04 January 2016 - 02:45 PM.


#6 Col-Arthur

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 03:02 PM

I like the Brandeis quote for the simple fact that we've seen the dramatic decline of the middle class in the last 20 yrs. I blame both parties for this and hope that some non-traditional candidates get a chance to serve.

Sadly, we have a political ruling class now instead of the citizen government the founders intended. While the argument against term limits is always "the voting booth offers term limits", it is obvious that the game is rigged for the incumbents through lobby money and gerrymandering. Gingrich's "Contract on America" (intentionally mis-named by me) pledge was soon ignored by his congressional class as they became aware of the perks available. 

Sanders is too far left for my tastes, Hillary is too duplicitous and no GOP candidate seems truly viable at this stage of the game.


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#7 Savile Row

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 03:29 PM

Sounds like the R's and the D's are too boringly old school,

duplicitously insidious

and way too conventional to some...

There are alternative choices!

The Greens maybe?
The "body politic" always needs motivated and informed candidates to seek office to represent them. 
If the D or R path is too encumbering or restraining,

a motivated person could possibly check out

the various third party options.

"We can have a democratic society
or we can have the concentration of great wealth in the hands of the few.
We cannot have both."
-- Louis Brandeis, Supreme Court Justice from 1916-1939."

 

The greatness of Capitalism.

The bleakness and despair of socialism/communism.

The dual duplicitousness of the politically entrenched....

The third party path may be open...

When is the first day to file as a D or an R?

Is  the Independent Party going to have a caucus and candidates?

 

:popcorn:


Edited by Savile Row, 04 January 2016 - 04:28 PM.


#8 kelley

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 07:02 PM

"Deputy-Arthur" posted: "I'm a new resident of Indiana and need to understand the political system here."
"I came from Kentucky where the divisions begin at precinct level

then up the ladder to city/county divisions, state legislative districts and finally to the federal congressional districts."

A good place to start
would be to do the same things
that you did in whatever county that you previously lived.
Maybe call one of your contacts there and they would give you advise.
Additionally,
you could then contact Kelley for the Independent Party,
Tom for the Democrat Party,
or Jamey for the Republican Party.

There is a lot going on in Clark County this year with the local races.
There will be loads of them filing very soon and they will bustin' their busy motivated and concerned politico ***es
chasing down votes and supporters!

Also,
the variety of candidates for state and federal office
have lots of campaign volunteers as well.
President, governor, senator, congresspersons, state offices,
state rep, state senator, etc.

Call a candidate and/or the office of someone you would like to support
and ask them what you can do.
The nifty Newsandtribune
covers the filings of the candidates.
That period will be opening up in February for the primary selection process.

Check out the Clark County Facebook pages for the D's and the R's to ask how to get involved.

The county level of government will be also electing two county commissioners,
three at-large county council critters,
a surveyor, and coroner.

If you are interested in learning,
look up the Clark County Government web site
and find out when the commissioners and the county council hold their meetings.
A great place to watch your government in action is to attend those meetings.

Kelley knows little or nothing about the Independent Party other than I think Mac had to actually join it or create a local affiliate for participation in some events during his Independent run for Sheriff.

However, if someone wants information about the Libertarian Party, I'm the chick. Our party can also be found on Facebook.

Edited by kelley, 04 January 2016 - 07:03 PM.

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#9 Savile Row

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:01 PM

Oops, my bad.  :sweat:  Kelley is correct.

I got the Independent Party confused with the Libertarian Party.

It is is the Libertarian Party that has also been organizing

in Clark County and offering alternatives in some  races.



#10 Col-Arthur

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:52 PM

I might be interested in exploring the Libertarian philosophy at the local level, but I don't see 3rd party platforms as viable on a national scale at this point in time. It takes big money to beat the system that is in place now.  


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#11 Tina

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:54 PM

I like the Brandeis quote for the simple fact that we've seen the dramatic decline of the middle class in the last 20 yrs. I blame both parties for this and hope that some non-traditional candidates get a chance to serve.

Sadly, we have a political ruling class now instead of the citizen government the founders intended. While the argument against term limits is always "the voting booth offers term limits", it is obvious that the game is rigged for the incumbents through lobby money and gerrymandering. Gingrich's "Contract on America" (intentionally mis-named by me) pledge was soon ignored by his congressional class as they became aware of the perks available. 

Sanders is too far left for my tastes, Hillary is too duplicitous and no GOP candidate seems truly viable at this stage of the game.

 

I agree with your quote and I'm the far right conservative. ;)

 

It's why I fought the RDA with tooth & nail.  We would only be consolidating more and more power & wealth into the hands of the few.  

 

From my experience almost anything branded as "consolidation to save money" never does.  All it does is rearrange it, and give people a bigger pot to play with.

 

In Indiana we have precincts but they are only party functions.  They are pretty much shells of positions because no one ever files for them, so the chairmen appoint them, and in turn, those precinct committee people vote for the chairman.  :shrug:   Want to know what's wrong with the parties?  That.right.there.  Even if you do get people to run, the big name people in the parties put their name in and maintain control.  Rinse.Repeat.

 

So the smallest unit of actual government is a municipal city/town.  From there, you have townships.  Then county.  Then state district.

 

If you live outside of town/city limits, then I recommend going to county meetings.

County council meets the second Monday of the month at 6pm.  Commissioners meet every other Thursday at 5pm.  Both meet at the county building in downtown Jeff on Court Ave, 4th floor.


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#12 Tina

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Posted 04 January 2016 - 09:57 PM

If you live in Union township, you don't live within municipal limits.

 

http://www.co.clark....diana-townships

townships-map.png


Edited by Tina, 04 January 2016 - 09:58 PM.

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#13 Kevin Vissing

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Posted 05 January 2016 - 07:04 AM

Greg Alexander is the Union Township Trustee. He is very active. His office is at his house north of Memphis.

#14 TruthToPower

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 08:41 AM

I'm a new resident of Indiana and need to understand the political system here.

I live in Union township, a political subset of Clark county from what I gather.

Are there township meetings other than the mandated January meeting of the trustees?

How does the system work?

I came from Kentucky where the divisions begin at precinct level then up the ladder to city/county divisions, state legislative districts and finally to the federal congressional districts.

I'd like to be active politically but don't know where to begin. I'll observe for as much time as necessary to become aware and informed of the issues locally.

Any information will be appreciated.

From a 10,000 foot view, all you need to know about Clark County politics is that it is the personification of the good ole' boy system.  Democrat or Republican....nepotism, double-dealing and outright theft at times rule the day.  As Tina alluded to with her reference to the RDA, Indiana is very fond of setting up TIFs which has resulted in bipartisan crony capitalism that robs money from public schools.  Clark County is on the spearhead of this ugly trend.  Cook County, IL has nothing on Clark Co., Indiana.



#15 Oldgoat

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 10:58 AM

From a 10,000 foot view, all you need to know about Clark County politics is that it is the personification of the good ole' boy system.  Democrat or Republican....nepotism, double-dealing and outright theft at times rule the day.  As Tina alluded to with her reference to the RDA, Indiana is very fond of setting up TIFs which has resulted in bipartisan crony capitalism that robs money from public schools.  Clark County is on the spearhead of this ugly trend.  Cook County, IL has nothing on Clark Co., Indiana.

Your statement makes some good points but I strongly differ with your analogy.  I know of no vocal opponents taking an unwanted swim in the local river like they do in Cook County.  Secondly, I think most of our local elected officials are trying to do a good job for their constituents.  The TIF thing is much, much bigger than local government. It is a bad idea that local governments are virtually forced into in order to compete for new business.  The states pas TIF laws so they can compete with other states that have them and each region of the state competes with the others.  It's a vicious circle that is driven by the public expectation that elected officials bring in more jobs.  By it's very nature, it encourages cronyism and inequality between old and new business.



#16 TruthToPower

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 03:14 PM

Your statement makes some good points but I strongly differ with your analogy.  I know of no vocal opponents taking an unwanted swim in the local river like they do in Cook County.  Secondly, I think most of our local elected officials are trying to do a good job for their constituents.  The TIF thing is much, much bigger than local government. It is a bad idea that local governments are virtually forced into in order to compete for new business.  The states pas TIF laws so they can compete with other states that have them and each region of the state competes with the others.  It's a vicious circle that is driven by the public expectation that elected officials bring in more jobs.  By it's very nature, it encourages cronyism and inequality between old and new business.

The Cook County comparison might have been extreme, but i tell you what....3 or 4 years ago when the democrats were running everything, things were pretty bad then!



#17 Oldgoat

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 03:19 PM

The Cook County comparison might have been extreme, but i tell you what....3 or 4 years ago when the democrats were running everything, things were pretty bad then

 

 

Breaking the monopoly has been good for the area.  Competition helps keep things honest and for too man years there was none.


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#18 Tina

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Posted 07 January 2016 - 03:20 PM

California banned redevelopment commissions because they were bankrupting the state. When the schools, counties and municipalities can't pay their bills they have to go to the state for more and more funding. Its going to have to get much worse before they finally realized the damage they've done.


And we need to continue to educate citizens that it is not the role of government to create jobs!
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