Jump to content



Photo

Genocide in the Central African Republic


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 Dave

Dave

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 475 posts

Posted 31 July 2015 - 10:29 PM

Enough of medians, democrats, needle exchanges, missing planes, dead lions, Roddy Piper, Planned Parenthood, and Methodists*.

 

I hereby declare my opposition to the ongoing genocide in the CAR.

 

*it's Hedley!

 

 



#2 kelley

kelley

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,112 posts

Posted 31 July 2015 - 10:40 PM

Leave Rowdy Roddy Piper alone.

What about Methodists?

I share your opposition. What's the plan?

#3 Dave

Dave

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 475 posts

Posted 31 July 2015 - 10:44 PM

 What's the plan?

 

Good question. Moral outrage is one thing, the formation of an executive committee is another.



#4 Donna

Donna

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,457 posts

Posted 01 August 2015 - 12:39 AM

Well, there's a dearth of information. 



#5 gettin-at-it

gettin-at-it

    ACCOUNT CLOSED

  • Account Closed
  • PipPip
  • 81 posts

Posted 17 September 2015 - 10:43 PM

At the current moment there is no plan in place. Present efforts are in place to plan to overthrow the Syrian govertment. Then we'll have to get back to that ISIS thing. In the meantime, if you discover any oil or gas or begin to occupy ideal pipeline routes, please let us know. Sorry about that there genocide thing. We know you'll do fine.

Sincerely,

U.S. State Department
  • kelley and CityBoy like this

#6 Dave

Dave

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 475 posts

Posted 18 September 2015 - 05:18 AM

Thanks State Department! It is nice to know we have our priorities straight.



#7 gettin-at-it

gettin-at-it

    ACCOUNT CLOSED

  • Account Closed
  • PipPip
  • 81 posts

Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:33 AM

Our priorities are consistent. If we obviously didn't care about saving peoples lives during Katrina, I can guarantee we care even less about some country in central Africa. But, you will buy our excuse about saving Syrian migrants lives, so we can cross the next country off the list of governments to overthrow. There's got to something in it for us. (Think $$$).

Thank you for your concern. I'm sure you can understand these are very complex issues that is way beyond your pay grade to understand. Standard logic and critical thinking will get you into trouble.

Sincerely,

U.S. State Department and Homeland Security
  • kelley and CityBoy like this

#8 Persona Non Grata

Persona Non Grata

    Commissioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,664 posts

Posted 18 September 2015 - 12:28 PM

Not really getting the connection between the State Department and Katrina.

#9 Dave

Dave

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 475 posts

Posted 17 December 2015 - 11:27 PM

And now this: French soldiers deployed in the Central African Republic had offered food to children as young as 9 in exchange for sex.

 

Maybe the CAR should issue a ban on visitors from France.



#10 kelley

kelley

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,112 posts

Posted 09 March 2016 - 10:33 PM

Also unconnected:

"This particular mass killing is unlikely to get much attention in the U.S. due to (1) the election-season obsession with horse-race analysis and pressing matters such as the size of Donald Trump’s hands; (2) widespread Democratic indifference to the killing of foreigners where there’s no partisan advantage to be had against the GOP from pretending to care; (3) the invisibility of places like Somalia and the implicit devaluing of lives there; and (4) the complete normalization of the model whereby the U.S. president kills whomever he wants, wherever he wants, without regard for any semblance of law, process, accountability, or evidence.

The lack of attention notwithstanding, there are several important points highlighted by yesterday’s bombing and the reaction to it:"

https://theintercept...ey-deserved-it/


"So yesterday the president killed roughly 150 people in a country where the U.S. is not at war. The Pentagon issued a five-sentence boilerplate statement declaring them all “terrorists.” And that’s pretty much the end of that. Within literally hours, virtually everyone was ready to forget about the whole thing and move on, content in the knowledge — even without a shred of evidence or information about the people killed — that their government and president did the right thing. Now that is a pacified public and malleable media."


Note: there are additional threads this could have gone in.

Edited by kelley, 09 March 2016 - 10:42 PM.

  • Quasar likes this

#11 snowman

snowman

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,673 posts

Posted 10 March 2016 - 06:06 AM

Nonetheless, most U.S. media reports contained nothing more than quotes from U.S. officials about what happened, conveyed uncritically and with no skepticism of their accuracy: The dead “fighters … were assembled for what American officials believe was a graduation ceremony and prelude to an imminent attack against American troops,” pronounced the New York Times. So, the official story goes, The Terrorists were that very moment “graduating” — receiving their Terrorist degrees — and about to attack U.S. troops when the U.S. killed them.

 

 

this could be true though... glenn greenwald doesn't have access to all the intelligence that the US government has. we are going after terrorists, no matter where they are. i think that is the official US policy at the moment.



#12 kelley

kelley

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,112 posts

Posted 10 March 2016 - 08:19 AM

Could be...

#13 snowman

snowman

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,673 posts

Posted 11 March 2016 - 02:03 PM

One of the surprising things in these conversations was how fatalistic he is about the Middle East, especially considering where he was when he started as president. You know, one of his big first speeches was a speech in Cairo which was meant to reset relations with the Muslim world. And he had a lot of hope for the peace process, he had a lot of hope for transition and during the Arab Spring - the first days of the Arab Spring. But he has come to the conclusion that there's nothing that the United States can do. Nothing that would change systems in the Middle East, nothing the United States can do that would make the Middle East a better place. He believes it's a generational problem. He believes that the forces of fundamentalism and tribalism are so strong in the Middle East that the U.S. would be foolish to try to shape that region.

 

 

interesting interview...

 

http://'The Obama Do... Foreign Policy


Edited by Quasar, 11 March 2016 - 02:19 PM.
Fixed broken link...

  • Quasar likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users