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Can you feel the HIV Squeeze yet?

Stuck in the middle!

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#1 Kruger87

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 07:04 AM

Every night and every morning my wife and I watch the news and wonder when it is going to hit our city and our county. To our North in Scott County there is the HIV outbreak because of Heroin users and dirty needles. So our State leaders decide to have a needle exchange program to get the dirty needles off the street and get the users clean ones. The first problem there is that you are exchanging them in a county building so drug users are reluctant to go there because they may be questioned by Police. The second problem is that the state is now contributing to their addiction. Then lets look to the south of us. We have the city of Louisville handing out Overdose Kits to drug users in case they OD on their drugs. It is nice that the city wants to save a life of an OD patient but then again you are allowing the person to go back and do it again when they feel better. It is kind of like our government is telling our kids not to play with guns but handing them a loaded pistol. The states have become an enabler in their addictions.

 

When will this epidemic spread to our county and city? We already have a Methadone Clinic in our city than brings a lot of drug users to this area. We have a lot more ways into the city now with the walking bridge open and the bike path on the 2nd street bridge. Then there is the prescription drugs plaguing our community. does anyone know how many Narcotic Detectives we have in the city? If my memory serves me right I think it is 2. I walk my grass in my front and side yards very carefully because there are a lot of Homeless and shady characters that walk by. The last thing I want is for one my kids or friends or family members to step on a dirty needle.


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#2 TLIES

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 07:34 AM

 

When will this epidemic spread to our county and city? 

 

 

It's here. ask the police and probation.  Jeff and Clark county have already seen an epidemic of Meth, crack and now Herion is quickly the rise.


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#3 GrumpyGranny

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 07:55 AM

Just one question...say I go in an get a new, clean needle...what's to keep me from still sharing this needle with others? I will assume that if I do, the consequences for all who share it are the same as if we'd used a dirty needle to begin with.


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#4 kelley

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 08:41 AM

There is an exchange component to most programs. Hundreds of used needles have been turned in to Scott Co. program.

#5 GrumpyGranny

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 09:22 AM

There is an exchange component to most programs. Hundreds of used needles have been turned in to Scott Co. program.

 

Yes, I do realize that, but exchanging a used one for a new one doesn't guarantee the one turned in wasn't shared and that the new one won't be shared, too.


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#6 Persona Non Grata

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 09:23 AM

Our regional health officials are not exactly blazing new trails here. Needle exchange programs have been used throughout North America for decades. The effects of such programs are well documented and they are proven not to increase drug use in the communities where they exist. They will not increase the chances of someone "stepping on a dirty needle". They are called "needle exchanges" because, in order to get a clean needle, one must turn in a dirty needle.

 

"After reviewing all of the research to date, the senior scientists of the Department and I have unanimously agreed that there is conclusive scientific evidence that syringe exchange programs, as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy, are an effective public health intervention that reduces the transmission of HIV and does not encourage the use of illegal drugs."

- (US Surgeon General's Determination of Effectiveness of Syringe Exchange Programs)

 

http://www.drugwarfa...h.2k0Llg9x.dpbs


Edited by Persona Non Grata, 21 April 2015 - 09:25 AM.

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#7 Kruger87

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 10:22 AM

 The effects of such programs are well documented and they are proven not to increase drug use in the communities where they exist. They will not increase the chances of someone "stepping on a dirty needle". They are called "needle exchanges" because, in order to get a clean needle, one must turn in a dirty needle.

 

"After reviewing all of the research to date, the senior scientists of the Department and I have unanimously agreed that there is conclusive scientific evidence that syringe exchange programs, as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy, are an effective public health intervention that reduces the transmission of HIV and does not encourage the use of illegal drugs."

- (US Surgeon General's Determination of Effectiveness of Syringe Exchange Programs)

 

http://www.drugwarfa...h.2k0Llg9x.dpbs

Sorry I do not trust the so called facts that agency is providing. It would be a disaster to report that the drug use is up after the exchange. Also the second line stating the part of  "not increasing the chance of stepping on a dirty needle" it does not state the possibility of decreasing it either. The residents in Scott County have already stated to the news agencies that they are still finding the needles in the yards after heavy rain storms.

 

We are spending money for addicts to get their fix everyday when we should be trying to find a way to get the addicts off the fix. The police have a pretty good idea where the drugs are but the lawyers keep them from doing their jobs. I have no sympathy for a drug user or drug dealer. I have sympathy for the families that are affected by the end results.


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#8 Persona Non Grata

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 10:35 AM

Sorry I do not trust the so called facts that agency is providing. It would be a disaster to report that the drug use is up after the exchange.

 

So you think health officials are knowingly implementing programs which increase drug abuse and HIV cases and then manipulating the data to cover up what is happening? Why would they do that? Do you have any evidence that supports this contention?


Edited by Persona Non Grata, 21 April 2015 - 10:52 AM.

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#9 Stephen Voelker

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:01 AM

The exchange does not prevent drug use. The exchange prevents the spread of the disease. If anyone has an answer to stopping addiction let me know.


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#10 Kruger87

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:01 AM

Why would our government say that there were WMD's in Iraq and we never found any? Why would the government pay $10,000 for a hammer in the military? I am not saying it is just health officials casting fog over the truth, there are a lot of agencies that do not tell the real version of what is happening. Wouldn't the pharmaceutical companies who sell the needled to the government make a profit off such a tragedy? How about those in the Government who know that there is going to be a spike in the demand, wouldn't they be able to profit from it?

 

Also what kind of example are we setting for our children when the government is willing to hand out OD kits and clean needles for user's? I know some would say that they are trying to contain a situation but as a parent of 4 kids I say it is enabling the user to keep using. Why have the drug programs in the school if we are doing this on the outside?



#11 Kruger87

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:04 AM

The exchange does not prevent drug use. The exchange prevents the spread of the disease. If anyone has an answer to stopping addiction let me know.

I think the penalties need to be tougher on the drug users and the dealers. Some of these guys get a slap on the wrist. I like the laws overseas in countries like Turkey, China, Hong Kong etc. They do not coddle the drug users and dealers. They make their lives hell!!!



#12 Persona Non Grata

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 11:14 AM

Why would our government say that there were WMD's in Iraq and we never found any? Why would the government pay $10,000 for a hammer in the military? I am not saying it is just health officials casting fog over the truth, there are a lot of agencies that do not tell the real version of what is happening. Wouldn't the pharmaceutical companies who sell the needled to the government make a profit off such a tragedy? How about those in the Government who know that there is going to be a spike in the demand, wouldn't they be able to profit from it?

 

It's not just the government that supplies the data in support of needle exchange programs. But you are obviously not going to be swayed. To those who are not so rigid in your position on this issue and want to learn more, a simple Google search on "viability of needle exchange programs" or "needle exchange programs pros and cons" can provide a wealth of interesting reading.



#13 Persona Non Grata

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 12:08 PM

The exchange does not prevent drug use. The exchange prevents the spread of the disease.

 

Exactly.



#14 woo

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 01:49 PM

Every night and every morning my wife and I watch the news and wonder when it is going to hit our city and our county.

I knew there was a reason that I spent my Thunder day putting up security cameras.



#15 Jules

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 04:47 PM

They do not coddle the drug users and dealers. They make their lives hell!!

Their lives are already hell.

 

Trust me, that is NOT the answer...I don't have one either, but know that's not it.


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#16 Bikerdude

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 05:24 PM

Every night and every morning my wife and I watch the news and wonder when it is going to hit our city and our county. To our North in Scott County there is the HIV outbreak because of Heroin users and dirty needles. So our State leaders decide to have a needle exchange program to get the dirty needles off the street and get the users clean ones. The first problem there is that you are exchanging them in a county building so drug users are reluctant to go there because they may be questioned by Police. The second problem is that the state is now contributing to their addiction. Then lets look to the south of us. We have the city of Louisville handing out Overdose Kits to drug users in case they OD on their drugs. It is nice that the city wants to save a life of an OD patient but then again you are allowing the person to go back and do it again when they feel better. It is kind of like our government is telling our kids not to play with guns but handing them a loaded pistol. The states have become an enabler in their addictions.

 

When will this epidemic spread to our county and city? We already have a Methadone Clinic in our city than brings a lot of drug users to this area. We have a lot more ways into the city now with the walking bridge open and the bike path on the 2nd street bridge. Then there is the prescription drugs plaguing our community. does anyone know how many Narcotic Detectives we have in the city? If my memory serves me right I think it is 2. I walk my grass in my front and side yards very carefully because there are a lot of Homeless and shady characters that walk by. The last thing I want is for one my kids or friends or family members to step on a dirty needle.

 

Area up'ere.....been ruff fer a loooong time.....you jus' now  hear'n 'bout it........an' if ya think it ain' here.....in'is County......you'd be mistaken.... :whistle:


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#17 Oldgoat

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Posted 21 April 2015 - 09:18 PM

For most of the last 30 years police have focused on the dealers.  Fact is, the users are a threat to society AND themselves.  While I have no way of verifying it, I heard from a fairly reliable source that one of the infected parties had been turning "tricks" at the rest area and local truck stops and had allegedly had sex with at least 75 people AFTER finding out they were HIV positive.  While I don't think prison is the answer, people like this OR those that are proven to be sharing needles should be institutionalized for their own safety as well as the public.  Letting these people walk around and spread disease is illogical and assinine. As in-patients they MAY even get clean and they  would be much less likely to OD.  Send them to the old hospital in Madison, it's barely being used.


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#18 Oldgoat

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Posted 22 April 2015 - 02:05 PM

This grieving family tells it like it is!   http://www.wlky.com/...linkId=13701582



#19 Persona Non Grata

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Posted 22 April 2015 - 02:37 PM

This grieving family tells it like it is!

 

Yep. And no where in that story did they say their daughter should have been in prison or that we as a society should have been striving to "make her life hell".



#20 Mary

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Posted 22 April 2015 - 03:04 PM

For most of the last 30 years police have focused on the dealers.  Fact is, the users are a threat to society AND themselves.  While I have no way of verifying it, I heard from a fairly reliable source that one of the infected parties had been turning "tricks" at the rest area and local truck stops and had allegedly had sex with at least 75 people AFTER finding out they were HIV positive.  While I don't think prison is the answer, people like this OR those that are proven to be sharing needles should be institutionalized for their own safety as well as the public.  Letting these people walk around and spread disease is illogical and assinine. As in-patients they MAY even get clean and they  would be much less likely to OD.  Send them to the old hospital in Madison, it's barely being used.

So basically lets round up drug users, individuals with HIV, AIDS, etc and lock them up in an institution? If you DON'T treat the WHOLE person then you've done nothing to help them.  Individuals with drug addictions are not bad people-they typically have multiple issues contributing to their addiction.  Locking them up away from society isn't an answer..I wish I knew the answer but thats not it.  The needle exchange is a start.  More treatment centers that are FREE for those who want help would be another answer. The methadone clinic-though loathed by many-is another answer-at least those going there are not using heroin and leaving dirty needles laying around.


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