Jump to content



Photo

Tax Watch...Is the GCCS system planning to build up to NINE new schools?

Lots O money Educate the masses Keep trying

  • Please log in to reply
178 replies to this topic

#21 littletommy

littletommy

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 397 posts

Posted 30 January 2015 - 04:39 PM

During a well-attended public meeting regarding the tax referendum, Ms. Knotts was asked if the tax increase went through, would she guarantee that GRC stayed open.  She hedged, and more people asked.  She finally said that there was no guarantee.  No wonder that tax referendum went down like a lead balloon! 

I think a lot of us had a bad feeling about that one, and pretty much knew it was innevitable. At least she didn't just out and out lie about it.



#22 Donna

Donna

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,465 posts

Posted 30 January 2015 - 07:54 PM

I work at the church next door to GRC.  For many years, we had an after school program once a week for those kids that was well attended.  Our Vacation Bible School was well attended by neighborhood children that went to GRC.  We also sponsored a Back to School shindig with food, fun and games, and school supplies.  Clarksville Parks & Recreation had a summer program for neighborhood kids that was also well attended and parents & kids loved it, my own kids included.  The school was shut down, and now, there are precious few children in the neighborhood.  Families with young children migrate to neighborhoods that have an elementary school.  Kim Knotts was very upset when the GRC PTO contacted my church for meeting space to discuss the rumored closure.  She called and tried to bully me (!) into not allowing them to meet at the church.  Not happening on my watch, and I have watched this neighborhood for a couple of decades.  The parents deserved to have their say.  Her response was that the PTO doesn't have their facts straight, misinformation, yada, yada, yada!  As the meeting was open, I told her to come and speak her piece.  She didn't.  But the powers-that-be love a capital program and Ms. Knotts was working on the Tech School (unbeknownst to any of us at the time.)  So, they have their expensive Tech School with about 50 students from Clarksville.  This did not turn out to be the magnet they expected.  Green Acres is overwhelmed with students and a hole was ripped into the GRC neighborhood.  This is why I abhor shutting down neighborhood schools.


  • GrumpyGranny, snowman, Tina and 1 other like this

#23 Victor Truth

Victor Truth

    Tourist

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 35 posts

Posted 31 January 2015 - 04:30 PM

Kim Knott
Didn't the board non renew her contract?
This is her last year correct?
I have not seen a superintendent search announced in C ville

#24 Donna

Donna

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,465 posts

Posted 31 January 2015 - 05:54 PM

They did not renew her contract.  I believe this is the last year of her contract.  I have not seen or heard of a superintendent search.  I suppose the school board can keep her on without renewing the contract until such time that they are ready to announce a new superintendent.



#25 Holy Cow

Holy Cow

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 297 posts

Posted 01 February 2015 - 04:28 AM

Indiana law is very specific about the timelines for non-renewing a superintendent, and it is a multi-step process. Without being too specific, the school corporation must formally notify the superintendent that it is considering non-renewal by December 31st, and have all final actions (conferences, board vote to non-renew, etc.) taken before before February 1st.

 

The way the law reads, if anything of this has not happened by the dates prescribed, the contract automatically rolls over for one year.


  • Donna likes this

#26 Savile Row

Savile Row

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,922 posts

Posted 01 February 2015 - 12:24 PM

Sleepy,

dude, what have you heard on the discussion
about the  GCCS system's possible huge capital project to build nine new schools?



#27 Avid Reader

Avid Reader

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 388 posts

Posted 10 February 2015 - 06:50 PM

Why is GCCS investing in a radio station when the TV station hasn't produced a single item this year? Radio is dying out. More and more drivers are listening to satellite radio, listen to audio books or hooking up iPhones or iPods. Why is GCCS spending money on this? Could it be because Dr. Melin hired his friend to take over WJHS? Could it be that the enrollment in the vocational television class has dwindled down to nothing since the students have not produced any programming this year? Could it be that Melin's friend will need something to fill out his schedule since he decimated the television program at JHS? Curious minds, who pay taxes to GCCS, would like to know.


  • IntegrityMatters, snowman and Donna like this

#28 Donna

Donna

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,465 posts

Posted 10 February 2015 - 07:44 PM

Dr. Melin will tell you, as he did the audience at a recent school board meeting, that he got his start in radio at high school, and it allowed him to work as a local radio DJ.  I'm not sure he realizes radio stations have a lot of canned programs and few actual on-air DJ's.

 

In regards to the new schools, rumor has it he wants to close Maple, Spring Hill, Thomas Jefferson and Wilson.  There is also a rumor that he wants to propose a referendum for the November election.  These are rumors, but they come from some pretty knowledgeable sources.

 

He is having a "Parents Listening" meeting at Maple Elementary, tomorrow, Feb. 11th at 5:30 pm.  There is usually a question & answer segment, but be advised that he would rather parents just listen.  He gets a little contrary if you ask questions he doesn't want to answer.   

 

Edit to add:  I advise anyone with questions or concerns to attend these informal meetings.


Edited by Donna, 10 February 2015 - 07:45 PM.


#29 Jeff all my Life

Jeff all my Life

    Commissioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,210 posts

Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:37 PM

Why is GCCS investing in a radio station when the TV station hasn't produced a single item this year? Radio is dying out. More and more drivers are listening to satellite radio, listen to audio books or hooking up iPhones or iPods. Why is GCCS spending money on this? Could it be because Dr. Melin hired his friend to take over WJHS? Could it be that the enrollment in the vocational television class has dwindled down to nothing since the students have not produced any programming this year? Could it be that Melin's friend will need something to fill out his schedule since he decimated the television program at JHS? Curious minds, who pay taxes to GCCS, would like to know.


Well, first I would say that satellite radio is still radio, it's just delivered differently. Secondly, talk radio has never been bigger than it is right now. Also podcasts have become very popular, and while they are delivered differently, many of the same skills are used.

#30 Avid Reader

Avid Reader

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 388 posts

Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:56 PM

Well, first I would say that satellite radio is still radio, it's just delivered differently. Secondly, talk radio has never been bigger than it is right now. Also podcasts have become very popular, and while they are delivered differently, many of the same skills are used.

 

Radio (satellite and otherwise) is programmed by a specialized programmer who programs several stations at a time. This person is not a DJ. This takes many years of experience in the field. The DJ voices you hear are pre-recorded. For every hour of music, there is approximately 7 minutes of talk time on satellite radio. Local radio DJs are also often pre-recorded and often work at more than one station to make ends meet.

 

Podcasts are not created by a DJ, you or I could create a podcast with a digital recorder and a computer. My wife mentioned teachers who have students create podcasts for class projects. Podcasting is not a highly skilled task. I am not sure having a class to teach podcasting is a good investment.

 

Talk radio hosts are usually experts in some field who lend authority to the topic. The number of radio jobs is dwindling. For my tax dollars it's just not a sound investment considering the teacher in charge has not produced one single WJHS broadcast this year. Why would taxpayers expect a single radio broadcast?


  • snowman and Donna like this

#31 IntegrityMatters

IntegrityMatters

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,995 posts

Posted 10 February 2015 - 08:59 PM

These radio stations are costing over $3 million dollars -- yes that is $3+ million.    Just how many students will actually benefit from these radio stations?? How can GCCS afford to spend this much (even if they say they will apply for some grants to help offset part of the cost) when teachers in other disciplines have to buy basic supplies with their own money or have fundraisers to raise money for their classrooms?  Why don't we invest several million in the arts or humanities?  Why not build a larger auditorium or spend more on drama or art or any other area?   While a few students may go into radio as a career, that number will be small.  There are a myriad of career choices out there for students besides radio --- will any of those receive similar funding? 

 

I hope there is no referendum to raise taxes for GCCS --- because I certainly will vote NO!


  • snowman and Donna like this

#32 woo

woo

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,726 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 06:45 AM

Well, first I would say that satellite radio is still radio,

Let me know when you hear a severe weather alert on satellite radio.

Or a local traffic report.

 

The school board could set up the radio station to broadcast on the net for a fraction of the cost.


  • Avid Reader likes this

#33 ChopperWoman

ChopperWoman

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,605 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 07:12 AM

We listen to WNAS 88.1 FM all day, every day in our office. That is New Albany High School's radio station and we love it. They play the biggest variety of music I have ever heard on a radio station, from Herb Albert and the Tijuana Brass to AC/DC, plus public service announcement, and commercials. I would assume they are supported by the income they receive from commercials. Sure, we could listen to canned music all day long but how boring is that?


  • JHS1982 and snowman like this

#34 Jeff all my Life

Jeff all my Life

    Commissioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,210 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 08:02 AM

Radio (satellite and otherwise) is programmed by a specialized programmer who programs several stations at a time. This person is not a DJ. This takes many years of experience in the field. The DJ voices you hear are pre-recorded. For every hour of music, there is approximately 7 minutes of talk time on satellite radio. Local radio DJs are also often pre-recorded and often work at more than one station to make ends meet.

Podcasts are not created by a DJ, you or I could create a podcast with a digital recorder and a computer. My wife mentioned teachers who have students create podcasts for class projects. Podcasting is not a highly skilled task. I am not sure having a class to teach podcasting is a good investment.

Talk radio hosts are usually experts in some field who lend authority to the topic. The number of radio jobs is dwindling. For my tax dollars it's just not a sound investment considering the teacher in charge has not produced one single WJHS broadcast this year. Why would taxpayers expect a single radio broadcast?


Off the top of my head, I was able to count ten local sports talk shows, 6 of which I'm pretty sure went to school for broadcasting/communications. And all those shows require producers, who all most assuredly went to school for broadcasting/communications. Shows that do have a "celeb" host often have a co-host that is a radio/media veteran so that celeb has someone to play off of and allow a more smooth product. A guy I went to high school with, who went to school for media, currently host a sports talk show in OKC.

Yes you and I could both do a podcast. Doesn't mean we have the skills to make it successful.

#35 Jeff all my Life

Jeff all my Life

    Commissioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,210 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 08:05 AM

Let me know when you hear a severe weather alert on satellite radio.
Or a local traffic report.

The school board could set up the radio station to broadcast on the net for a fraction of the cost.


For many years, cable didn't severe alerts (now it's delivered via computer system through the cable company and not the station) and I doubt many people wouldn't call that television.

#36 Donna

Donna

    Local Legend

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,465 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 08:32 AM

Pretty hefty price tag for a school system that is begging for dollars.  I hope it pays off for the students in professional skills. 


  • IntegrityMatters and Avid Reader like this

#37 IntegrityMatters

IntegrityMatters

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,995 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 08:48 AM

I would venture to say that most people in radio/tv today did not get their start at their high school radio station!   My sister worked in radio/tv all her life -- many years for NBC news in Washington, D.C.    She started out her career at an all-news radio station in Washington before moving on to AP and then NBC.   She was not involved in a radio station at her high school --- which was Jeff High.   Sometimes I think we go overboard with what is offered at the high school level.   Kids need their basic skills more than anything in high school --- good ole reading, writing and arithmetic -- and a taste for the arts!   While it is great to pique their interest in various career options, it is not necessary to spend $3.2 million dollars on a radio station that will benefit only a very few students --- and then go begging for more money from the electorate. 


  • Donna and Sleepy like this

#38 woo

woo

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,726 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 09:01 AM

For many years, cable didn't severe alerts (now it's delivered via computer system through the cable company and not the station) and I doubt many people wouldn't call that television.

I really don't quite understand your post, and I work in TV.

Locals handle their own EAS alerts, cable provides the EAS alerts for the national stations.

 

The system is based on county codes (fips codes)


Edited by woo, 11 February 2015 - 09:02 AM.

  • Donna likes this

#39 Sleepy

Sleepy

    Commissioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,359 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 11:57 AM

Didn't we pay for a Facilities Study...Waiting until after election to share?

 

TIC TOC



#40 IntegrityMatters

IntegrityMatters

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,995 posts

Posted 11 February 2015 - 12:35 PM

The facility study cost approx. $120,000 --- it was completed quite awhile ago (at least 9 months to a year).  They have never released any information about it that I have seen.   But I feel certain it will be used as their basis for closing schools and building new ones -- and for asking the taxpayers to pay more! 


  • Donna likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users