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Tax Watch...Is the GCCS system planning to build up to NINE new schools?

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#1 Savile Row

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:22 AM

Tax Watch

Is the GCCS system planning upon building NINE new schools?

 

 



#2 Savile Row

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:29 AM

Those  dern  pesky breakfast hot spots keep asking
more questions!
 
Will there be a public referendum on this huge
"possible"  spending plan?
 
Will the neighborhood school concept be continued and strengthened?
Will the older, sometimes declining neighborhoods be protected?
Isn't there a strong need to protect and continue
neighborhood schools?


Edited by Savile Row, 29 January 2015 - 10:40 AM.


#3 Savile Row

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:39 AM

Are Maple Street,  Parkwood,

Thomas Jefferson, Bridgepoint,

Wilson, and Spring Hill in danger

of "consolidation"?

Charlestown's schools?

New Washington totally wiped out?

 

The discussion needs to start and someone should be proactive.

Transparency.



#4 Savile Row

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:45 AM

Donna wisely posted on another thread last fall:

"Keeping neighborhood schools open
reduces the need for transportation
and increases student involvement within their neighborhood school.
Shutting down neighborhood schools tears the heart out of neighborhoods
and disengages school kids. It is a recipe of decline. Just say "Yes!" to Spring Hill
and Maple continuing their good works within our communities. Very few busses needed."



#5 Savile Row

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:49 AM

If there is a public referendum

on this possible big scale plan,

will the government entity proposing it

be allowed to fund their campaign with public tax funds?

The taxpayers' money?

 

That would seem really unfair.

 

 


Edited by Savile Row, 29 January 2015 - 10:52 AM.


#6 IntegrityMatters

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:57 AM

Are Maple Street,  Parkwood,

Thomas Jefferson, Bridgepoint,

Wilson, and Spring Hill in danger

of "consolidation"?

Charlestown's schools?

New Washington totally wiped out?

 

The discussion needs to start and someone should be proactive.

Transparency.

 

 

Transparency????   GCCS?????  Are you serious?


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#7 Savile Row

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 11:01 AM

The breakfast clubs are reporting
that the Clarksville Community Schools entity
is having some real financing headwinds.
Perhaps, it is time for a merger with GCCS.
That helps strengthen and protect the neighborhood schools concept.
while providing the resources for a quality education
in the future.
Four area high schools
within the new combined school district
and a strong neighborhood continuation
of middle and elemenatary schools.



Extensive combined resources
and local neighborhood schools
with close supervision
and teaching for the children.


Edited by Savile Row, 29 January 2015 - 11:30 AM.


#8 Tina

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 12:46 PM

Would the additonal $1m+ currently redirected away from the CC school district into TIF help Clarksville?

#9 Holy Cow

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 04:19 PM

I do not wish this to be construed as opposing neighborhood schools, but I would like to pose a question. We now have state policies that allow for district to district transfers, charter schools, and private, voucher schools. Does that strong school choice policy framework tend to fly in the face of neighborhood schools with students being able to attend schools outside of the geographic boundaries that determine "neighborhood school" zones? 



#10 IntegrityMatters

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 04:33 PM

I believe in neighborhood schools and I believe in school choice.   Neighborhood schools are wonderful for many students but they may not be a "good fit" for all students in the neighborhood.   Those students deserve to be able to attend whichever school will allow them to achieve the best academic success --- whether a neighborhood school, charter school (which is a public school), or a private school.    Parents and students deserve choice. 


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#11 Donna

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 04:36 PM

As you well know, Holy Cow, GCCS fights any charter school start-ups.  Here in Clark County the only choices are private schools or GCCS schools.  Not really a "strong school choice policy framework."  If the parent(s) feel that their district is NOT serving their child(ren) they should transfer out of district.  This seldom happens at the elementary level.  Usually it is with middle & high school students. 


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#12 Holy Cow

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 04:40 PM

IM, your response captures the nature of my question. If enough parents exercise the right the state has given to choose another school and leave the neighborhood school and/or id the a neighborhood becomes a magnet for students who wish to choose that school, does that compromise the very nature of neighborhood schools? Again, I am wondering what happens to the identity of neighborhood schools when the neighborhood is not really producing the student population.



#13 Holy Cow

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 04:44 PM

Donna, I did a bunch of looking into this when we discussed it on another thread. I found only one community in the entire state where the school district embraced charter schools. That was Evansville when the school district actually opened a charter school. As of late, Indianapolis Public Schools under the direction of their new superintendent actually used a new state law (HEA-1321, I think) to use a charter school in its district as an independently run district school. My point is that GCS is not much different when it comes to this issue than anywhere else in the state.


Edited by Holy Cow, 29 January 2015 - 04:47 PM.


#14 Donna

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 07:14 PM

So, you agree that there really isn't a "strong school choice policy framework" in Greater Clark?  It's just GCCS or private schools as far as I can tell.



#15 IntegrityMatters

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 08:11 PM

Holy Cow --- the neighborhood school is usually an elementary school ---and  the elementary schools in GCCS do fairly well academically.  Parents of young children usually prefer a  school in their neighborhood and generally opt out of that school only if their child has a particular need that can't be met by that school or if the parents prefer a Catholic or other religion based education for their child.   So I don't think that a large number of elementary students in a neighborhood would be leaving for a charter or private school nor do I think it would be a "magnet" as you said for students to transfer there.  The neighborhood schools should not fear charters or private schools in my opinion.  If the traditional public schools are doing a great job, parents will not want to leave.   But the dynamics are quite different when children get to the middle school or high school level as Donna said.  The middle/high schools are not "neighborhood" schools.  In fact, as you know, in Jeff there are only two middle schools and one high school that all the neighborhood elementary schools feed into.   Sometimes students have difficulty adapting in a very large school setting and I believe it is wonderful for those students to have other options/choices available. 

Neighborhood elementary schools provide more than just education to students -- they are used for many community gatherings, events, ball games, etc. and are an integral part of the neighborhood.  They play a vital role in the community and I would hate to see them abandoned in favor of one "mega" school. 

 

GCCS needs to be on the cutting edge -- like Evansville.   It is time that the traditional public schools embrace charters and work with them instead of against them.  After all -- it is supposed be about "what is best for the students" right?   Instead, the traditional schools think they can serve the needs of "all" children and don't want to allow anything to interfere with their monopoly.   Shame on them.  


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#16 Donna

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 08:25 PM

Clarksville Community Schools closed George Rogers Clark elementary claiming their budget had to be cut back, all the while, they were gearing up for their "High Tech" school that has approximately 50 kids!  They ripped a whole in the Old Clarksville neighborhoods.  Sent busses to pick up kids to overfill what used to be called Green Acres Elementary school.  I will NEVER be a fan of closing neighborhood schools, too much damage done to communities and, ultimately the children.


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#17 littletommy

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 09:42 PM

Clarksville Community Schools closed George Rogers Clark elementary claiming their budget had to be cut back, all the while, they were gearing up for their "High Tech" school that has approximately 50 kids!  They ripped a whole in the Old Clarksville neighborhoods.  Sent busses to pick up kids to overfill what used to be called Green Acres Elementary school.  I will NEVER be a fan of closing neighborhood schools, too much damage done to communities and, ultimately the children.

Don't forget all the new vehicles and expensive trash cans they bought shortly after saying they didn't have the money to keep GRC open.

 

Edit: Hey, I finally made it to 100 posts!!!!


Edited by littletommy, 29 January 2015 - 09:43 PM.


#18 Donna

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Posted 29 January 2015 - 10:11 PM

Well, littletommy, you're on your way to legend status!  You're no longer a tourist!  BWA! HA! HA!

 

I don't know of any vehicles or expensive trash cans bought by Clarksville Community Schools, though.



#19 littletommy

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 01:41 PM

Yep, I believe it was over the summer after GRC closed that I started seeing all the new vehicles, a few trucks, and the Ford Flex, I think it's called. Look at the cans in front of the middle school with the logos on them, those things were crazy expensive. And then, there's the kawasaki 4 wheeler that the custodian drives around to pick up trash on the property. Back when Clarksville schools were more frugal, I remember the older guy that was a custodian there walking the property with a stick with a nail on the end to pick up litter.

 

I also remember how the school board wanted to raise our property taxes in order to keep GRC open, and that was voted down. "if we don't get "our fair share" I think is how Knott words it, "we'll have to close GRC"........Yeah, right, that decision was already made long before the property tax increase was voted down.



#20 Donna

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Posted 30 January 2015 - 03:47 PM

During a well-attended public meeting regarding the tax referendum, Ms. Knotts was asked if the tax increase went through, would she guarantee that GRC stayed open.  She hedged, and more people asked.  She finally said that there was no guarantee.  No wonder that tax referendum went down like a lead balloon! 


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