Jump to content



Photo

Lime Manufacturing Resources of Utica


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#1 Bedford

Bedford

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 496 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 04:36 PM

Just found out we now have some new properties n the National Register of Historic Places, under the group heading Lime Manufacturing Resources of Utica.

INDIANA, CLARK COUNTY,

Howes', Mitchell P., Lime Kiln and Quarry,

Address Restricted,

Utica vicinity, 13001007,

LISTED, 12/30/13

(Lime Manufacturing Resources of Utica, Indiana MPS)


INDIANA, CLARK COUNTY,

Starkweather's, Samuel, Lime Kiln and Quarry,

Address Restricted,

Utica vicinity, 13001008,

LISTED, 12/30/13

(Lime Manufacturing Resources of Utica, Indiana MPS)


INDIANA, CLARK COUNTY,

Tyler, Moses H., Company Lime Kiln and Quarry No. 1,

Address Restricted,

Utica vicinity, 13001009,

LISTED, 12/30/13

(Lime Manufacturing Resources of Utica, Indiana MPS)


INDIANA, CLARK COUNTY,

Tyler, Moses H., Company Lime Kiln and Quarry No. 2,

Address Restricted,

Utica vicinity, 13001010,

DETERMINED ELIGIBLE, 12/30/13

(Lime Manufacturing Resources of Utica, Indiana MPS)


Haven't found the form where they discuss the importance of these yet.


#2 Tina

Tina

    Tinacious

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,739 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 05:08 PM

Do these just happen to be in the path of the new bridge?

#3 Bedford

Bedford

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 496 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 05:58 PM

I have no idea, but wouldn't surprise me.

#4 Tina

Tina

    Tinacious

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,739 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 06:39 PM

http://www.gpo.gov/f.../2013-30612.pdf

Notice that NONE of the other properties on the register have their addresses concealed...

I searched on all the owners names in eGIS and found nothing. Nothing under "Lime" either.

Why the secrecy?

Hopefully our resident historian, Riverfox, can help.

Maybe a title change would pull him in? "Lime Mftg Resources is now historic." Quasar?

Good find Bedford!

Edited by Tina, 10 January 2014 - 06:41 PM.


#5 Tina

Tina

    Tinacious

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,739 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 06:46 PM

http://www.in.gov/dn...2013-Agenda.pdf

VI. Set date for the next meeting
Proposed date: January 22, 2014, IGCS, Conf. Rooms 1 & 2, 1:30 p.m.
Deadline for receipt of Certificate of Approval applications: December 13, 2014, 4:45 p.m.

#6 Tina

Tina

    Tinacious

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,739 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 07:25 PM

http://www.in.gov/dn...storic/3682.htm
Register listing DOES:
  • Give a property prestige and publicity
  • Provide protection for the property from federally assisted projects
  • Permit the owners of income-producing properties to use investment tax credits for certified rehabilitation
  • Allow owners of certain publicly owned or publicly accessible, non-income-producing properties to apply for federal rehabilitation grants

  • Bigfoot likes this

#7 Bigfoot

Bigfoot

    Commissioner

  • Moderators
  • 1,291 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 07:59 PM

http://www.in.gov/dn...storic/3682.htm
Register listing DOES:

  • Give a property prestige and publicity
  • Provide protection for the property from federally assisted projects
  • Permit the owners of income-producing properties to use investment tax credits for certified rehabilitation
  • Allow owners of certain publicly owned or publicly accessible, non-income-producing properties to apply for federal rehabilitation grants


Sounds like River Fields trying to stop the bridge still. get the properties protected then halt the bridge.
  • Tina likes this

#8 Tina

Tina

    Tinacious

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,739 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 08:22 PM

Notice how registering gives your property prestige and publicity....

well that is unless you hide the address!

#9 RiverFox

RiverFox

    Resident Historian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,645 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 10:01 PM

There are kiln ruins on either side of the right-of-way.
http://wikimapia.org...646383&z=18&m=b
... but if there were any in the way they're gone now.

If they wanted to save lime kilns it should have been done before
they destroyed the ones north of Coopers Lane.

Edited by RiverFox, 10 January 2014 - 10:12 PM.


#10 Oldgoat

Oldgoat

    Commissioner

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,980 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 10:06 PM

Tina, there are several kilns adjacent to the bridge right of way. Just above Utica on River Road as you approach the right of way you can look to the left and see a large stone structure, a remnant of a kiln. Just a little further up the road is an archway (within a few feet of the road) that I was always told was a tunnel from the kiln to the river for barge loading. Hopefully they were designated so as to protect them from unnecessary destruction. As I see it, the highway will miss them but not by much. Bairds History of Clark County has some info on the kilns around Utica.

#11 Bedford

Bedford

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 496 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 10:55 PM

Good find Bedford!


Thanks. I used to be highly active on Wikipedia, and I did a lot of articles on there about local properties on the list. I subscribe to an email that tells all the new properties and I am always on the lookout for those in Indiana and Kentucky.
  • Oldgoat likes this

#12 HoundDog

HoundDog

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 806 posts

Posted 10 January 2014 - 11:53 PM

Mitchell P. Howes is my great-great-grandfather. Anything in this historic status that benefits me? LOL

From April 7, 1888 Jeffersonville Evening News (repeated verbatim on 4/13/1888 in Jeffersonville's National Democrat weekly newspaper);


"Death of M. P. Howes

"It is the sad duty of this paper to chronicle the death of another pioneer citizen and a good man, M. P. Howes of Utica, departed this life at 3 o'clock this morning after a two weeks illness of paralysis of the bowels.

"The deceased was a native of Dutchess County, New York, the home of his childhood being located on the Hudson river, directly opposit West Point. He was born January 9, 1819, hence he is sixty-nine years old. He came West in 1837 and located first in Jefferson County, Ky., coming thence to this county and locating on the hill above Utica in 1848. There he has resided ever since. During his early life he was a stock trader and made one hundred trips to New Orleans. Later he became a farmer and interested in turnpikes, owing at the time of his death the Utica pike and a controlling interest in the Shelbyville and Louisville pike, beside which he owned much real estate.

"He leaves a wife and ten children. The children are: Charles, Alonzo M., Epenetus and Jarvis Howes; Mrs. Mary E. Smith, Port Fulton; Mrs. W. E. Hyatt, Mrs. Jennie Summers, Mrs. Emma Lentz, Mrs. Nannie Bushfield and Miss Annie Howes of Utica.

"His son, Charles Howes, arrived this morning from Orlando, Florida.

"Mr. Howes was one of the leading citizens of Utica and both precept and life was a strong example for good. He was a true gentleman in the best sense of the word and there are none but words of love and commendation to echo over his grave.

"His death will leave a vacancy in the township which it will be hard to fill, while the family deeply feels the loss of a loving husband and father.

"In their great affliction the sorrowing members have the sympathy of the entire community.

"The funeral takes place tomorrow, Sunday, at 2 p.m. from the family residence, Elder Harry Jackson of Charlestown, conducting the last sad rites."



#13 RiverFox

RiverFox

    Resident Historian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,645 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 04:57 PM

Cool! :thumbsup: Here's an old property map from 1858.
Posted Image
I marked the ruins that I know about. (I mostly hung around the edges of the big quarry)
You can see where the old quarry was. (just SSE of the Howes name, in the lower notch)
Evidently there were kilns closer to town that are long since gone.
The Lentz property was just north of the Wood property.

Edited by RiverFox, 11 January 2014 - 05:02 PM.


#14 Tina

Tina

    Tinacious

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,739 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 05:18 PM

Riverfox, do you know if these are in the path of the bridge or not?

http://eastendcrossi...oject-overview/

I hope they're not and it's just people honestly trying to protect historical sites.

#15 HoundDog

HoundDog

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 806 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 05:42 PM

For those unfamiliar with lime kilns, they were simple but critical facilities that heated crushed limestone to produce the lime powder essential to the manufacturer of cement (mortar).
Posted Image Lime Kiln.
The operation of the kiln is surprisingly simple. The kiln is hollow in the middle and a combination of limestone and fuel (often coal or wood) is dumped into it. When ignited the fire and heat burn off carbon from the limestone (a relatively soft rock) and a quick lime powder is the end result.

The kiln typically had 3-4 openings. The first we already mentioned at the top where the limestone and fuel was dumped. About halfway down the kiln one or more stoking holes allowed the fire to be managed, much like stoking a fireplace fire to burn all of the wood. The final hole resided at the bottom of the kiln, from which the resulting lime was extracted.

My understanding is it took a day to load the average kiln with tons of crushed limestone, a day to bring it up to temperature (900-1,000 degrees), a day or so to "cook" and a couple of days to cool so the kiln could be unloaded.

If you can imagine the number of brick or stone and mortar buildings constructed in Clark County and surrounding areas in the 1800s, you can get an idea of how important the lime kilns were to the local economy.
  • Tina likes this

#16 RiverFox

RiverFox

    Resident Historian

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,645 posts

Posted 11 January 2014 - 06:34 PM

Posted Image

The Ohio River Bridges Project team worked with area residents to locate and avoid
local natural and historical sites like this lime kiln near Utica in Clark County, IN.
The once-flourishing industry used Indiana limestone and dolomite to produce lime
for construction and agriculture from the mid-1800s to early 1900s.

http://www.fhwa.dot....ds/04jul/03.cfm


  • Tina likes this

#17 deerhunter

deerhunter

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 520 posts

Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:48 AM

Tina I believe the property is owned by Chuck Moore

#18 deerhunter

deerhunter

    Councilman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 520 posts

Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:51 AM

I was always told that the Archway was the backdoor to a house that was lived in by one of my family members.

#19 Beerguy

Beerguy

    Resident

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts

Posted 20 January 2014 - 08:45 AM

There are kiln ruins on either side of the right-of-way.
http://wikimapia.org...646383&z=18&m=b
... but if there were any in the way they're gone now.

If they wanted to save lime kilns it should have been done before
they destroyed the ones north of Coopers Lane.


I remember when they knocked down the kilns on Coopers Lane.... I still don't remember if anything was built where they used to be, or if they just flattened the land.

#20 woo

woo

    Key Club

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,722 posts

Posted 27 January 2014 - 09:46 AM

CJ story.
http://www.courier-j...Bridges-Project
  • Tina likes this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users